Indian mascot designer passes away

Sophia Comas, Features Editor

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Charles “Brent” Yancey, former Manhattan High art teacher and coach, died in Good Shepherd Hospice House on March 25 at 84 years old.  

Yancey, born on July 23, 1933, was a lifelong resident of Manhattan and an active participant within the community, as well as MHS.

Yancey taught various art classes at MHS, including jewelry, drawing and painting. He also was assistant coach for football, and head coach for diving and golf, for which he was awarded Coach of the Year after the team won state in 1991.

Yancey’s experience as an art teacher contributed to the selection of the Indian as the MHS mascot, in honor of friend and colleague Frank Prentup. In 1940, the athletes of the time hosted a contest to choose a new symbol for the school and Yancey’s Native American design was selected. His Native American ancestry contributed to his artwork, and the wall of West Campus is decorated with a mural of his official Indian logo, along with many different areas of the school.   

According to the Yorgensen-Meloan-Londeen Funeral Home, Yancey was a member of the Vista Coffee Group and the Manhattan Country Club since 1964 and participated in a variety of Bible groups.

He is survived by his wife Lynda; two daughters, Karen in Prairie Village and Brenda Sinks and her husband Chuck in Overland Park; two grandchildren, Charles L. Sinks and Catherine Mitchum; and two great-grandchildren, Lillian Sinks and Jacob Mitchum.

His funeral was held on March 28, at Seven Dolors Catholic Church; he was buried at Ascension Cemetery in Wichita.

Charles “Brent” Yancey, former Manhattan High art teacher and coach, died in Good Shepherd Hospice House on March 25 at 84 years old.  

Yancey, born on July 23, 1933, was a lifelong resident of Manhattan and an active participant within the community, as well as MHS.

Yancey taught various art classes at MHS, including jewelry, drawing and painting. He also was assistant coach for football, and head coach for diving and golf, for which he was awarded Coach of the Year after the team won state in 1991.

Yancey’s experience as an art teacher contributed to the selection of the Indian as the MHS mascot, in honor of friend and colleague Frank Prentup. In 1940, the athletes of the time hosted a contest to choose a new symbol for the school and Yancey’s Native American design was selected. His Native American ancestry contributed to his artwork, and the wall of West Campus is decorated with a mural of his official Indian logo, along with many different areas of the school.   

According to the Yorgensen-Meloan-Londeen Funeral Home, Yancey was a member of the Vista Coffee Group and the Manhattan Country Club since 1964 and participated in a variety of Bible groups.

He is survived by his wife Lynda; two daughters, Karen in Prairie Village and Brenda Sinks and her husband Chuck in Overland Park; two grandchildren, Charles L. Sinks and Catherine Mitchum; and two great-grandchildren, Lillian Sinks and Jacob Mitchum.

His funeral was held on March 28, at Seven Dolors Catholic Church; he was buried at Ascension Cemetery in Wichita.

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