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Bond referendum passes, changes set to begin

Sophia Comas, Sports Editor

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As of this Tuesday after the midterm elections, USD 383 has confirmed the approval of the $129.5 million bond referendum centered on making district-wide improvements across all levels of students and staff.

USD 383 will continue to work in what they feel is the district’s best interest through the new implements the referendum now allows them to carry out, especially at the high school level where significant changes are set to take place.

“We are excited about the many benefits for our students, and will eagerly begin the process to improve facilities and transition to an Early Learning, K-5, 6-8 and 9-12 configuration,” Dr. Marvin Wade, superintendent, said in a written statement. “We all know this is about much more than buildings and that we cannot move too quickly into the next phase of this project.”

The proposed improvements meant to create more efficient and safer learning environments at Manhattan High are set to begin four years from now according to Board of Education member Leah Fliter. This includes tearing down A Hall to reconstruct a two-story hallway in order to accommodate the freshmen class, which will permanently move to the West campus.

“Moving the ninth graders to the West campus will give freshmen more opportunities to participate in electives and clubs and will save students eight minutes of lost class time per hour for those who travel from East Campus to West Campus for Band, Orchestra and other classes,” Fliter said. “The move will also save USD 383 $100 thousand per year in bus costs to take students to and from MHS East and West.”

Changes such as these make the district hopeful of a productive educational system for both teachers and students as well as making schools safer and less mobile through the bond referendum, which will only cost the average homeowner in Manhattan an annual tax increase of roughly $180.

“We’ve already begun preparations to put required notifications in the paper, to sell bonds and to release Requests for Qualifications,” Wade said. “We are confident relationships developed during the bond campaign will continue to flourish as we work together to provide even greater opportunities for our children and youth.”

 

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The student news site of Manhattan High School
Bond referendum passes, changes set to begin